Tag Archives: beings

Mythical Beings {15} ~ Fairy

“A fairy (also fay, fae, fey, fair folk, or faerie) is a type of mythical being or legendary creature found in the folklore of multiple European cultures (including Celtic, Slavic, German, English, and French folklore), a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural, or preternatural.

Myths and stories about fairies do not have a single origin, but are rather a collection of folk beliefs from disparate sources. Various folk theories about the origins of fairies include casting them as either demoted angels or demons in a Christian tradition, as deities in Pagan belief systems, as spirits of the dead, as prehistoric precursors to humans, or as spirits of nature.

The label of fairy has at times applied only to specific magical creatures with human appearance, magical powers, and a penchant for trickery. At other times it has been used to describe any magical creature, such as goblins and gnomes. Fairy has at times been used as an adjective, with a meaning equivalent to “enchanted” or “magical”. It is also used as a name for the place these beings come from, the land of Fairy.

A recurring motif of legends about fairies is the need to ward off fairies using protective charms. Common examples of such charms include church bells, wearing clothing inside out, four-leaf clover, and food. Fairies were also sometimes thought to haunt specific locations, and to lead travelers astray using will-o’-the-wisps. Before the advent of modern medicine, fairies were often blamed for sickness, particularly tuberculosis and birth deformities.

In addition to their folkloric origins, fairies were a common feature of Renaissance literature and Romantic art, and were especially popular in the United Kingdom during the Victorian and Edwardian eras. The Celtic Revival also saw fairies established as a canonical part of Celtic cultural heritage.”

Source ~ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairy

Mythical Beings {13} ~ Kelpie

A kelpie, or water kelpie, is a shape-shifting spirit inhabiting lakes in Scottish folklore. It is a Celtic legend; however, analogues exist in other cultures. It is usually described as a black horse-like creature, able to adopt human form. Some accounts state that the kelpie retains its hooves when appearing as a human, leading to its association with the Christian idea of Satan as alluded to by Robert Burns in his 1786 poem “Address to the Devil”.

Almost every sizeable body of water in Scotland has an associated kelpie story, but the most extensively reported is that of Loch Ness. Parallels to the general Germanic Nixe or nixie and the Scandinavian bäckahäst have been observed. More widely, the wihwin of Central America and the Australian bunyip have been seen as counterparts. The origins of narratives about the creature are unclear but the practical purpose of keeping children away from dangerous stretches of water and warning young women to be wary of handsome strangers has been noted in secondary literature.

Kelpies have been portrayed in their various forms in art and literature, including two 30-metre-high (100 ft) steel sculptures in Falkirk, The Kelpies, completed in October 2013.

Mythical Beings {12} ~ Unicorn

The unicorn is a legendary creature that has been described since antiquity as a beast with a single large, pointed, spiraling horn projecting from its forehead. The unicorn was mentioned by the ancient Greeks in accounts of natural history by various writers, including Ctesias, Strabo, Pliny the Younger, Aelian and Cosmas Indicopleustes. The Bible also describes an animal, the re’em, which some translations render as unicorn.

In European folklore, the unicorn is often depicted as a white horse-like or goat-like animal with a long horn, cloven hooves, and sometimes a goat’s beard. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it was commonly described as an extremely wild woodland creature, a symbol of purity and grace, which could be captured only by a virgin. In the encyclopedias, its horn was said to have the power to render poisoned water potable and to heal sickness. In medieval and Renaissance times, the tusk of the narwhal was sometimes sold as unicorn horn.

The unicorn continues to hold a place in popular culture. It is often used as a symbol of fantasy or rarity.

Mythical Beings {9} ~ Mermen

Mermen, the male counterparts of the mythical female mermaids, are legendary creatures, which are male human from the waist up and fish-like from the waist down, but may assume normal human shape. Sometimes they are described as hideous and other times as handsome.

Perhaps the first recorded merman was the early Babylonian sea-god Ea, whose Sumerian name was Enki, and was known to the Greeks as Oannes. Oannes had a fish head and man’s head beneath, and both a fish tail and man like legs, according to Berossus.

Mythical Beings {8} ~ Gorgon

A Gorgon (/ˈɡɔːrɡən/; plural: Gorgons, Ancient Greek: Γοργών/Γοργώ Gorgṓn/Gorgṓ) is a creature in Greek mythology. Gorgons occur in the earliest examples of Greek literature. While descriptions of Gorgons vary, the term most commonly refers to three sisters who are described as having hair made of living, venomous snakes and horrifying visages that turned those who beheld them to stone. Traditionally, two of the Gorgons, Stheno and Euryale, were immortal, but their sister Medusa was not and was slain by the demigod and hero Perseus.

Mythical Beings {7} ~ Minotaur

In Greek mythology, the minotaur is a mythical creature portrayed in Classical times with the head and tail of a bull and the body of a man or, as described by Roman poet Ovid, a being “part man and part bull”. He dwelt at the center of the Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze-like construction designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus, on the command of King Minos of Crete. The Minotaur was eventually killed by the Athenian hero Theseus.

Mythical Beings {6} ~ Pegasus

Pegasus (Greek: Πήγασος, Pḗgasos; Latin: Pegasus, Pegasos) is a mythical winged divine horse, and one of the most recognized creatures in Greek mythology. Usually he is depicted as pure white. Myths about him vary as the Greek myths evolve and reflect progression through successive generations of deities.

In Archaic Greek mythology, Pegasus is the offspring of the Gorgon Medusa,[1] when she was depicted as a mare. In later myths, Pegasus was foaled by Medusa as she was dying, while being decapitated by the hero Perseus.

In Classical Greek mythology, the Olympian god Poseidon is identified as the father of Pegasus. Pegasus is the brother of Chrysaor and the uncle of Geryon. Pegasus was caught by the Greek hero Bellerophon near the fountain Peirene with the help of Athena and Poseidon. Pegasus allowed Bellerophon to ride him in order to defeat the monstrous Chimera, which led to many other exploits. Bellerophon later fell from the winged horse’s back while trying to reach Mount Olympus, where the deities resided. After that failed attempt, Zeus transformed Pegasus into the eponymous constellation.

Mythical Beings {2} ~ Cyclops

These mythical Greek monsters were enormous giants with just one large eyeball to see with. They were very hairy and didn’t care much for bathing so their heads and bodies were usually filled with insects and filth.

They were also known to carry a horrible stench wherever they were or wandered about.

They very much enjoyed feasting on raw flesh, including that of humans.

These monsters were said to reside below ground spending most of their time making huge tools and massive weapons.

The pounding of their humungous hammers was said to cause earthquakes up above. The heat from their furnaces would cause above ground volcanoes to erupt.

One famous Cyclops was named Polyphemus. He was the son of Poseidon, god of the sea. Hero Odysseus was able to escape Polyphemus’s capture by getting him drunk and then sticking a sharp spear into his eye.

This blinded the huge beast and Odysseus was able to escape unscathed.

~Whirling Your Way To Enlightenment~

“There are more techniques to get enlightened than most people imagine. Case in point: Turkey’s traditional Whirling Dervishes. Many Western tourists know of this odd-looking ritual, but how many of them know that this is a legit enlightenment technique? Developed by none other than the great Persian mystic Rumi.

Whirling is not just a hokey ritual but a form of active meditation. The spinning is designed to shut off the egoic monkey mind and produce states of ecstatic trance.

Read more about Sufi Whirling Dervishes on Wikipedia.

The symbolism of the ritual is pretty interesting too. The dancer wears a tall thick camel hair hat which represents the tombstone of the ego. The dancer’s white skirt represents the shroud of the ego which must be cast off (sound familiar?). The taking off of the black cloak prior to whirling represents spiritual rebirth into the Truth. The crossing of the arms represents the number one, for the nondual unity of God. The whirling is done around the center of the heart, which represents unconditional love for reality. And mantras are mentally recited while whirling to further still the monkey mind.

If you decide to give whirling a try at home, watch out that you don’t hit anything, or fall down, or faint from dizziness. This can be a physically dangerous technique. You can easily crack your head open. Best to do it out on a grassy field.”

Source ~ https://www.actualized.org/insights?p=30

~Monism~

“Monism is simply the idea that “strictly speaking, there exists only a single thing, the Universe, which can only be artificially and arbitrarily divided into many things” and that “only one kind of stuff exists, although many things may be made up of this stuff.”

This “stuff” is consciousness, or “mind”, out of which EVERYTHING is made. So… An atom is consciousness; a tree is consciousness; a car is consciousness; a rock is consciousness; the sun is consciousness; a mathematics equation is consciousness; a political party is consciousness; the Big Bang is consciousness; your skull is consciousness; the pixels on this screen are consciousness; and so on until every last object in the universe is accounted for. Reality is one unified field of consciousness which subdivides itself in infinite variations.

This is a very elegant and powerful explanation of reality. It also happens to be Absolutely True. It is so true that its truth is prior to any religion, philosophical system, scientific theory, or physical law. It is more true than 1 = 1.

I recommend you thoroughly read this Wikipedia entry on Monism. It’s a great encapsulation of metaphysics, religion, and God across history. Monism is just another word for nonduality, and every culture around the world has a storied history of it because it turns out to be the ultimate truth. The only problem is that ultimate truth turns out to be a tricky thing for the mind to grasp.”

Source ~ https://www.actualized.org/insights?p=29