Tag Archives: belief

Psychology Phenomena {2} ~ Reverse Psychology

Reverse psychology is a technique involving the assertion of a belief or behaviour that is opposite to the one desired, with the expectation that this approach will encourage the subject of the persuasion to do what is actually desired. This technique relies on the psychological phenomenon of reactance, in which a person has a negative emotional reaction to being persuaded, and thus chooses the option which is being advocated against. This may work especially well on a person who is resistant by nature, while direct requests works best for people who are compliant. The one being manipulated is usually unaware of what is really going on.

~This Work Is Not About Belief~

“All of my teachings are worthless unless you validate them in your direct experience. This stuff is far too profound to be heard or believed. Belief in what I say is a great obstacle to this work. You will spend years believing me only to realize that you made a big mistake. Yet at the same time, actively disbelieving me — trying to debunk me or debate me — is an even greater mistake. The correct method is to listen to what I say, consider it as an advanced possibility, and do the work to validate this possibility and feel it as your living reality. This work is about transforming your experience of reality.

I have no desire to make you believe in God or my teachings. What you believe is such a shallow level that it is irrelevant as far as this work goes. What matters is what you’re conscious of, what state of consciousness you’re in, and what the meta, cognitive structures of your mind are. This work is not about the contents of your mind. This work is structural. Think of this difference as the difference between apps vs the OS or BIOS on a computer. In our work here, we’re not interested in changing the apps of the human mind, we’re interested in changing the OS & even the BIOS. This work is meta work. This work is experiential. This work is about changing what reality is for you. You don’t even know what that means yet. It will take you years of work just to appreciate what was just said. And that’s as it must be. You can’t know what you’re missing until years of trial and error.

It would speed things along greatly for you to realize that we are not interested in getting you to believe things here. Anything you believe is far too shallow to help you. Belief is like a veil of fakery which obscures the doing of the real work. So be careful not to get tricked into thinking you are doing the work when you are merely rearranging your beliefs. The real work requires hours upon hours of precise mindfulness and accurate self-observation. Precision and accuracy in this work is important.

Towards this end it would help you greatly to distinguish between what is a belief, and what is not. Spend some time observing in your direct experience what is a belief, and what is not. Get really clear about this without getting caught up in the trap of judging whether a belief is true or false. What’s more important than whether a belief is true or false is that you are conscious that it is a belief regardless. For example, “The Earth is round” is a belief regardless of whether its “true”. Just because a belief is “true” does not mean it isn’t problematic or doesn’t distort your experience of reality. In this sense, scientific beliefs can be more problematic than religious ones because scientific beliefs are not usually acknowledged to be beliefs, or problematic — yet they are both.

Notice the distinct difference between believing a thing and direct experience. Notice that experience does not care what you believe. Although of course your beliefs greatly distort and color your experience.

And even though I call all this “work”, you must find a way to do it so that you enjoy the process, rather than making it some chore that you must do. You will never be successful in this work as long as it feels like a chore. You must find a way to connect it with your passion for life. It must become an organic part of your life.”

Source ~ https://www.actualized.org/insights?p=19

Quotes {100} ~ A Belief Thief

“It’s so important to identify beliefs.
Because once you identify [a negative belief], once you bring it into the light, you will see it doesn’t belong to you:

  • That it came from your parents;
  • It came from your family;
  • It came from your society;
  • It came from your friends.
    And you bought into it. But it isn’t yours.

Holding on to something that isn’t yours is called theft.
Don’t be a belief thief!

Let go of what isn’t yours.” ~ Bashar

Religion {7} ~ Santeria

Santeria combines influences of Caribbean tradition, West Africa’s Yoruba spirituality, and elements of Catholicism.

To become a Santero, or high priest, one must pass a series of tests and requirements prior to initiation.

The Origins of Santeria
Santeria is, in fact, not one set of beliefs, but a “syncretic” religion, which means it blends aspects of a variety of different faiths and cultures, despite the fact that some of these beliefs might be contradictory to one another. Santeria combines influences of Caribbean tradition, West Africa’s Yoruba spirituality, and elements of Catholicism. Santeria evolved when African slaves were stolen from their homelands during the Colonial period and forced to work in Caribbean sugar plantations.

Santeria is a fairly complex system, because it blends the Yoruba orishas, or divine beings, with the Catholic saints. In some areas, African slaves learned that honoring their ancestral orishas was far safer if their Catholic owners believed they were worshiping saints instead – hence the tradition of overlap between the two.

The orishas serve as messengers between the human world and the divine. They are called upon by priests by a variety of methods, including trances and possession, divination, ritual, and even sacrifice. To some extent, Santeria includes magical practice, although this magical system is based upon interaction with and understanding of the orishas.

Religion {5} ~Rastafari

Rastafari is a young, Africa-centred religion which developed in Jamaica in the 1930s, following the coronation of Haile Selassie I as King of Ethiopia in 1930.

Rastafarians believe Haile Selassie is God and that he will return to Africa members of the black community who are living in exile as the result of colonisation and the slave trade.

Rastafari theology developed from the ideas of Marcus Garvey, a political activist who wanted to improve the status of fellow blacks.

There are approximately one million world wide adherents of Rastafari as a faith. The 2001 census found 5,000 Rastafarians living in England and Wales.

Followers of Rastafari are known by a variety of names: Rastafarians, Rastas, Sufferers, Locksmen, Dreads or Dreadlocks.

~It spread globally following the success of Bob Marley and his music in the 1970s
~Rastafarians believe that blacks are the chosen people of God, but that through colonisation and the slave trade their role has been suppressed
~The movement’s greatest concerns are the repatriation of blacks to their homeland, Africa, and the reinstatement of blacks’ position in society
~It is an exocentric religion – as Haile Selassie, whom adherents consider as God, is outside the religion
~Rastafari religious ceremonies consist of chanting, drumming and meditating in order to reach a state of heightened spirituality
~Rastafarian religious practice includes the ritual inhalation of marijuana, to increase their spiritual awareness
~Rastafarians follow strict dietary laws and abstain from alcohol.
~Rastafarians follow a number of Old Testament Laws
~There is a separate code of religious practice for women in Rastafari
~Rastafarians believe reincarnation follows death and that life is eternal
~Rastafarians are forbidden to cut their hair; instead, they grow it and twist it into dreadlocks
~Rastafarians eat clean and natural produce, such as fruit and vegetables
~Rastafarians try to refrain from the consumption of meat, especially pork
~Rastafarians are opposed to abortion and contraception
~The Rastafarian colours are red, green and gold. Sometimes black is added. These colours are chosen because ~Red signifies the blood of those killed for the cause of the black community, throughout Jamaican history
~Green represents Jamaica’s vegetation and hope for the eradication of suppression
~Gold symbolises the wealth of Ethiopia
~Black signifies the colour of the Africans who initiated Rastafari
~The lion is the symbol of Rastafari. This lion represents Haile Selassie I, who is referred to as the ‘Conquering Lion of Judah’. Rastafarians’ dreadlocks represent the lion’s mane.

Poetry {11} ~ Medicinal Contagious Brew

Contagious laughter

Cathartic effect thereafter

Medicinal brew

Oh, how we whisked the love through

Put a dose in your stew

Spreading the love virus wide

Seeing beyond the mental confusion of divide

In our maker we confide

Laughing takes us on a ride

A joyful melody of sound

Once it starts ringing, pass it all around

Keeping our feet on the ground

Feeling your internal sun

Relasing your endorphins of fun

Joker, jester be a comedian

Share the love, let go of the tragedian

~DiosRaw 01/04/21

The Human Family Crash Course Series {4} ~ Relationships ~ How To Raise Highly Sensitive Children

Welcome fellow souls to « The Human Family Crash Course Series», a new project collaborated together by empress2inspire.blog and diosraw0.wordpress.com. Together we will be working on a different topic for each crash course; our fourth topic is focused on «Relationships.» Each topic will have eight posts with posts on Mondays and Thursdays. We hope you enjoy our series and we look forward to knowing how our posts have inspired you!

Highly sensitive children are often misunderstood. Their sensitivity is treated by the adults as “too emotional” and need to “toughen up.” This kind of response causes long lasting mental and emotional scars which in some cases affect the overall growth of the child even when they become adults. That’s why posts like these are important. We need to encourage our children to love their sensitivity from a young age.

Here are seven things we should communicate to our sensitive children.

“All of your emotions are acceptable.”
At some point in our lives, most of us have been told not to cry. While tears might be gaining an iota of societal respect, emotions such as anger, anxiety, and hurt continue to be judged as “unhealthy.” Highly sensitive children (HSCs) are wired to fully experience the entire spectrum of human emotion. When we give HSCs permission to experience their emotions without being told they’re bad, they benefit in a powerful way. Then, we can teach them tools to transform an emotion such as anger into creative fuel to do something constructive.

“It’s healthy to experience emotion about injustice.”
At an early age, HSCs need to hear that it’s okay to get upset when they see others experiencing pain. This is a compassionate response, not an overreaction. Rather than dismissing their experiences, we need to acknowledge the hurt. When the time is right, help your child take meaningful action, such as starting a fundraiser, speaking out, or making a donation to a charitable organization that fights for the cause.

“Let others know when you need alone time.”
Highly sensitive adults aren’t the only ones who need alone time. HSCs, whether they are introverts or extroverts, will need alone time after stimulating activities like attending birthday parties or play dates. Even just a normal day at school — with all its noise, activity, and socializing — can be fatiguing and overwhelming for them. Let’s teach HSCs to ask for alone time proactively. That way, it won’t come in the form of a meltdown later.

“Listen to your body.”
HSPs are highly intuitive and can naturally sense subtleties. Unfortunately, our conditioning moves us away from listening to what our bodies intuitively tell us, so we may lose this connection as we get older. That’s why we should teach sensitive children to notice how their body feels, for example, when they eat a certain food or hang out with a certain friend. Similarly, when they are overwhelmed, we can teach them to find a place in their body that feels calm (like a finger or toe). This is a powerful grounding skill HSCs can use to regulate their bodies’ responses.

“It’s okay to say no.”
Children are accustomed to hearing the word “no,” but they usually don’t get permission to use it themselves. Obviously, it’s up to parents to set their own boundaries for when “no” is acceptable. But consider asking if your child wants to go to Henry’s birthday party before simply sending the RSVP. Certainly, “no” is a delicate balancing act with children, but if encouraged mindfully, it can be an important step in learning healthy boundaries.

“Take all the time you need to process.”
Just like adult HSPs, HSCs may require extra time to process information. According to Dr. Elaine Aron in The Highly Sensitive Person, one of the four characteristics of all highly sensitive people is “depth of processing.” This means that when HSCs receive information, they think about it deeply, analyzing the issue from many different angles and connecting it to a larger picture. Depth of processing can make life rich and meaningful for HSPs, but it also slows us down. Simply being patient and allowing your child extra time to process honors this special gift.

“The world needs special people like you.”
There’s no question that our world needs more empathy, listening, and understanding. Sensitive children can also be extremely analytical and creative. Let’s show them — through our words and actions — that even though the world is challenging at times, their sensitivity is a gift that can help others in countless ways.

~Garima {Empress2Inspire}