Tag Archives: concepts

Short Stories {3} ~ Paradox Diffusion

Years after searching for God in psychedelics, Rumi had not wavered in her quest for knowledge. Without the benefit of a prescribed social role, she did what she wanted, when she wanted, which was to learn without regard for convention. Today, paradoxes were circulating around her mind, determined, she would not sleep without finding her answer.

At other times and in other places, Rumi would have been burned at the stake, hailed as a prophet, or stoned. The present time simply ignored her. Normal people treated Rumi as a public garbage can, light post, or stalled car, as an obstacle that could be moved but numbed by her surroundings.

“Take your pills NOW,” shouted the nurse down the corridor, from Texas’s renound mental hospital for the “insane.” Rumi rolled her eyes as Nurse Truchin’s sharp voice echoed and bounced off blood stained walls, she was sitting in room 23, her white washed room “gifted” to her by her parents, they could not cope with her cosmic mind anymore. Rumi had been in Senora Texas Mental Hospital for two weeks and she felt on edge, this was her first time in an asylum. Rumi paced up and down her abode, she had to take those dreaded sleeping pills or else they would force it down her throat somehow. Reluctantly she calmly walked down the hallway and was handed her pill through the dorms pill shutter.

Rumi swallowed the pill. “Good, now go back to your room, checks are at 11pm, make sure you are in your bed or you know what will happen,” said Nurse Truchin coldly. Rumi said nothing, she would achieve nothing by responding and quietly returned to her room blocking out the screams from the room beside her’s.

Shutting her door, relieved, she lay on her bed staring at the white washed walls that had become her friend. What were paradoxes? How could two opposing propositions exist at the same time? The sleeping pills were making her more and more drowsy. Lonely and with a heavy heart she pulled the duvet above her head. “A paradox is a statement or problem that either appears to produce two entirely contradictory (yet possible) outcomes, or provides proof for something that goes against what we intuitively expect,” Rumi reiterated inside of her mind.

Hallucinating as she usually did on these pills, she saw imagery quite like her visions on magic mushrooms a few months ago. Warping geometric patterns danced in a trance with eachother as her eyes flickered going in and out of consciousness.

I will sleep on this Rumi decided in her mind drifting off into the astral planes.

Upon awakening her answer had arrived, getting out her notebook she wrote “Paradoxes lead you to God.”

On her day of release, after all this time pretending to act normal to get out of this hell hole of an asylum, Rumi saw Mrs. Truchin as “insane” and Mrs. Truchin saw Rumi as insane. Rumi quietly knew that duality breaks down into formless consciousness; she was sane in an insane world.

“I know one thing,” Rumi said to Mrs. Truchin as she left the asylum doors. “And that is that I know nothing.” Rumi remembered studying ancient Greek philosopher’s such as Socrates years ago. Mrs. Truchin took one bewildered look at Rumi and walked away. Rumi smiled to herself and smelt freedom once again, her taxi was awaiting to pass through the doors into the insane world.

Time is a construct of consciousness and in higher dimensions has no meaning. but, in the lower dimensions it is used to measure changes and in the multitudes of parallel timelines all simultaneously existing. Paradoxes melt into the all, Source, Brahman, Allah, whatever name you stamp onto formless ether.

~DiosRaw 01/04/21

The Human Family Crash Course Series {5} ~ Communication {3} ~ How To Explain Complex Ideas Simply

Welcome fellow souls to « The Human Family Crash Course Series, » a new project collaborated together by empress2inspire.blog and diosraw0.wordpress.com. Together we will be working on a different topic for each crash course; our fifth topic is focused on «Communication.» Each topic will have eight posts with posts on Mondays and Thursdays. We hope you enjoy our series and we look forward to knowing how our posts have inspired you!

“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.” ~ Confucius says, even Leonardo Da Vinci said “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” So what do these two people mean? Have you ever struggled to put complex ideas into simple concepts? Our lives are ruled by complex concepts and learning, which only seem to complicate and expand the closer we examine them.

Here are some tips for you to explain complex ideas simply ~

~Use little technical language. Try not to use too much technical language, if you do, make sure it is absolutely necessary in order to help the audience understand or appreciate your point – and ensure that you explain the word or term immediately afterwards.
Remember that there is a difference between using language that is simple (easy to understand), and simplistic (treating the problem as if it is not actually very complex at all). Keep your words simple and clear, and use real-life examples and illustrations where possible. But don’t patronise your audience by pretending that something is not as complicated as it really is.

~ Mirror effect. Good body language is crucial to keeping an audience engaged and interested. If you look alert but relaxed, your audience will mirror this and feel the same way. Stand up straight, but relax any tension or stiffness in your body with breathing techniques. It’s a good idea to gesture with your hands in such a way that helps to make clear what you are explaining – but only do this if it feels natural, waving your arms around unnecessarily may distract people from their focus.

Use imagery. They say that a picture paints a thousand words, and that’s true for the images we create through words. If you can get an audience to really ‘see’ what you’re trying to explain, they will not only be able to understand it better, but they will also remember it. Analogies and metaphors work well, a good metaphor for a complex topic will stay in people’s minds forever.

Break your concept down into manageable parts. Think of your talk as a series of stepping stones, and imagine yourself hopping easily from one stone to another. If one stone becomes wobbly or is washed away, you can simply jump forwards, sideways, or even backwards. Your journey to the other side will remain intact. If you can think of your talk as a series of self-contained mini-talks, then if one part goes wrong, gets forgotten, or simply doesn’t feel like it’s working on the day, you can go back to other section to bridge the gap.

~Dissect the information to understand and explain it simply. Link parts of information with other parts to find connections and reasoning. How do the concepts link?

~Identify the topic and conduct research. Gather as much information as you can find on your particular topic and write down what you aim to discover. What is the aim for converting your idea from complex to simple form?

~Clarify. Ask for feedback from the person or people you are conveying the concept or idea to, what did they gather from what you are saying? It is okay to repeat your words again until they are understood, sometimes knowledge takes time to digest and sink in.

We hope this helped give you some insights into simplifying your communication to convey concepts. If you have any ideas on how to form simple concepts from complex ideas feel free to leave your comments below.

~Amber {DiosRaw}

Zen Koans {41}

One day, Jizo received one of Hofuku’s disciples and asked him, “How does your teacher instruct you?” “My teacher instructs me to shut my eyes and see no evil thing; to cover my ears and hear no evil sound; to stop my mind-activities and form no wrong ideas,” the monk replied. “I do not ask you to shut your eyes,” Jizo said, “but you do not see a thing. I do not ask you to cover your ears, but you do not hear a sound. I do not ask you to cease your mind-activities, but you do not form any idea at all.

~Sthitaprajna~

Sthitaprajna is a Sanskrit term that means “contented,” “calm” and “firm in judgment and wisdom.” It is a combination of two words: sthita, meaning “existing,” “being” and “firmly resolved to,” and prajna, meaning “wise,” “clever” and “intelligent.”

In the Bhagavad Gita, sthitaprajna refers to a man of steady wisdom. The yogi is described in Sloka 55 as a sthitaprajna when he “renounces completely all the desires of the mind, when he is fully satisfied with his mind fixed in Atman.”

~Desavakasika~

Desavakasika is a Sanskrit disciplinary vow. Developed by the Jain monks, desavakasika, is the vow a person makes for how they will approach and live their life in their immediate environment. While the monks were known to sacrifice relationships and many comforts of life, they created a tiered set of vows that included the guna vratas, or “merit vows,” and the siksa vratas, or “disciplinary vows,” to help all yogis develop an intentional life.

~Abhinivesha~

Abhinivesha is a Sanskrit word meaning “will to live,” referring to the fear of death, even if life is full of misery. It is one of the five kleshas, or negative mental states that causes suffering. Not only is abhinivesha the fear of death, it also includes the incorrect identification of the true self with the temporary physical body or world. This fear can prevent a yogi from achieving moksha, or nirvana.

~Jagadguru~

Jagadguru is a term used for a guru whose influence on the world has the power to transform it. The term – literally meaning “guru of the world” – comes from the Sanskrit, jagat, meaning “world,” “Earth,” “the cosmos” or “mankind”; and guru, which means “teacher” and usually refers to a spiritual master.

The title of jagadguru is typically used in traditional orthodox Hinduism, particularly for acaryas (spiritual teachers) in the Vedanta school of thought who have written commentaries on the scriptures.

~Anava Mala~

Anava mala is one of the three malas, or impurities, in Shivaism, one of the major branches of Hinduism. The malas are aspects of consciousness that act as cloaks that prevent a yogi from seeing and experiencing his true nature or the true Self. They are the result of illusion, or maya.

Connected to the heart, anava mala is associated with insecurity, sadness, feelings of not being good enough, and unworthiness. Anava mala does not allow the yogi to recognize the divine within.