Tag Archives: duality

~Why You’re An Addict~

“According to research cited by Stan Grof, about 30-50% of substance addicts (alcohol, hard drugs) are really just seeking a nondual experience.

That’s why you’re doing the alcohol or drug. It gives you a simulated pseudo-spiritual experience of unity. It blots out egoic consciousness. But you don’t know this because you haven’t actually experienced real unity, and you don’t yet understand what consciousness is. So you keep hitting that bottle or pipe but it never scratches that mystical itch.

You got the right idea, but you’re going about it the wrong way.

To get drunk on God, your mind has to be ultra-sober. That’s what meditation, pranayama, clean eating, etc. is for. Your mind has to be attuned to the subtle. But you keep feeding it the gross.

Which is also why 5-MeO-DMT, LSD, and Ibogaine prove so effective for hard addiction recovery. They show you the real deal. They show you the subtle.

Which is why Bill Wilson, the founder of AA, included LSD as one of the most important components of recovery. Until of course the government banned it. Ever since, AA has been de-fanged.

If you’re saying to yourself, “Yeah, Leo, but I’m not a drug addict! How does this help me?” Oh, yes you are! You’re just addicted to something a little more subtle or culturally acceptable. Nevertheless, the underlying dynamic with you is just the same. What you seek is nonduality. Because it’s the greatest thing ever. Nothing else is even remotely close. But you don’t know it yet. You have to take my word for it.”

Source ~ https://www.actualized.org/insights?p=51

~Dvaita~

Dvaita is a word in Sanskrit that means “duality” or “dualism.” In its broadest sense, dvaita can refer to any concept that there are two principles or truths that exist completely separately and independently.

Dvaita is best known as the name of an important school of Vedanta, a philosophical system closely related to yoga. The Dvaita Vedanta school, unlike the other two main Vedanta schools, teaches that God is separate to and distinct from individual souls. In Dvaita philosophy, God takes on a personal role. He is perceived to be an eternal being that governs, controls and maintains the whole universe.