Tag Archives: express

Symbols {179} ~ Wishing Well

The wishing well has long been a symbol of good luck and good fortune. Children would throw their pennies into the well and make a wish which would be granted by some power. People would throw coins into streams and make a wish. If they landed heads up the wish would be granted. If it landed tails up the wish was not granted. Water was believed to have magical and healing powers. In Nordic mythology, Mimir is the Nordic god of wisdom. He is the wisest of all beings and guards a well. His well is where the world tree gets its sustaining water. If someone sacrificed something special to Mimir they would get what they wished for. Odin, the prevalent Norse god sacrificed his eye to the well to gain wisdom for saving the world from destruction.

There is a runic charm from Iceland called the wishing charm. It looks like the top of a well with four dippers surrounding it. The four dippers represent the crescent moon. Sacred women used to honor and guard wells and springs. To offer a prayer to the water goddess people would throw an offering in the well after making a wish. That is one of the origins of the modern wishing well. 

In Celtic and Germanic traditions some soldiers would throw their defeated enemies shields and armor into a stream as a sacrifice to the gods. In Germanic society people also believed that spirits lived in wishing wells. They would grant wishes as they pleased. People would whisper wishes to the spirits of the well. Celtic traditions include throwing a coin into the water to appease the goddess Coventina. Coventina’s well was located in the center of a small temple.

There is a runic charm from Iceland called the wishing charm. It looks like the top of a well with four dippers surrounding it. The four dippers represent the crescent moon. Sacred women used to honor and guard wells and springs. To offer a prayer to the water goddess people would throw an offering in the well after making a wish. That is one of the origins of the modern wishing well.

In Celtic and Germanic traditions some soldiers would throw their defeated enemies shields and armor into a stream as a sacrifice to the gods. In Germanic society people also believed that spirits lived in wishing wells. They would grant wishes as they pleased. People would whisper wishes to the spirits of the well. Celtic traditions include throwing a coin into the water to appease the goddess Coventina. Coventina’s well was located in the center of a small temple.

Did You Know {175} ~ Shakespeare Invented More Than 1,700 Words

Shakespeare wrote some of the most beloved and revered pieces of literature the world has ever known, but in order to craft his plays and poems, he sometimes resorted to making up his own words. In fact, The Bard is said to have come up with more than 1,700 words including moonbeam, laughable, eyeball, bump, puking, champion, bedroom, excitement, and zany.

~Sequencing~

Sequencing is the way in which yoga poses are placed in a particular order to create a yoga practice with a logical flow or focus on a particular outcome. The various schools of yoga may offer different ideas about how to sequence a yoga class or personal practice.

Some types of yoga, such as Ashtanga and Bikram, follow specific sequencing that does not deviate. While Ashtanga has six sequences of increasing difficulty, all Bikram classes follow the same 26-pose sequence in the same order. Other styles of yoga, such as Hatha, Vinyasa and Iyengar, require the teacher or yogi to create a sequence.

Many modern yoga practices are linear, meaning that they begin with basic poses that build on one another in a seamless manner and also build in difficulty before transitioning to cooling postures and relaxation. Poses are usually performed once in a sequence, but an alternate way of sequencing might have the yogi perform each posture more than once but focus on a different aspect of the pose each time.

Sequences can also have more specific goals. For example, sequencing can focus on poses that address certain conditions, such as headaches, menstrual discomfort or depression. Or, sequencing can target specific areas of the body (shoulders, core muscles or back) or particular types of poses (twisting postures, forward folds or backbends).

For proper sequencing, the yoga instructor must understand the poses, how the poses build on one another, what muscle groups are involved, what the purpose and benefits of the poses are, and what is appropriate for each yogi based on their level of skill and specific needs.

~Roga~

Roga is the name given to a modern style of yoga practice that is specially designed for runners, with the “R” from “run” replacing the “Y” in “yoga.”

The idea is that the yogi carries out asanas and breathing techniques aimed at improving their running ability, strength, flexibility and endurance. Roga can help runners to avoid injuries as well as to help them run more effectively. It can also help keep their mind clear and focused while out running.