Tag Archives: guru

Short Stories {1} ~ River Ganges Insanity

Washing off the days reminants within the womb of the River Ganges, in the ancient lands of India, a young lady named Anadi, combed through her dark black locks wishing she had fulfilled her guru’s daily tasks. Worried reverberations tensed her worn out body.

Anadi’s guru had instructed her to contemplate by the serene waters edge on the concept of enlightenment. She was trembling at the thought of going insane. Throughout her journey on the path of enlightenment she had visions of past lives, angelic beings, prophetic dreams and doubted herself, were these visions true or a figment of her mind turning her insane?

Observing the river’s candles lit each night floating along the river, Anadi realised in her mind “for the mystic swims in the same waters as the insane.”

Guruji initiated her, “you have understood the point.” Painting an orange hue on her third eye she became one of Guruji’s enlightened deciples.

“Yes,” Anadi proclaimed.

Anadi was no longer afraid of turning insane, she realised that insanity and sanity are part of the duality of this dualistic world. By using her mind towards the creator, and only him, she would return to sanity through the insanity she was so worried of.

As she lit her candle, with empowering energy flowing throughout her physical vehicle, silently whispering a prayer her body aroused from the dream of the dream she was living in. In the hypnotic state she was in upon waking, she had met her dead guru in her dream reassuring her she was not going crazy.

That very young morning, when everyone was asleep and the birds were churping their morning symphony she said her daily blessings by the river Ganges. “For I am sane in an insane world” she echoed through the nearby caves.

“I have travelled through madness to find me,” she screamed.

Madness is somewhere between chaos and having a dream. Anadi made sense of the dream by plunging into it and moving with the dance. For those who did not hear the music, those dancing were deemed insane.

And the world kept on spinning and weaving it’s cosmic web…

~DiosRaw 28/03/21

~The Guru Principle~

The guru principle (or guru tattva) is a cosmic principle that allows for the development of one’s inner consciousness to move from ignorance to reality. Although this can take the form of an individual being led by a guru, it can also be a path where wisdom and knowledge is transmitted over time.

Within yoga, many yogis have the goal of reaching enlightenment and spiritual freedom, which is thought to be the guru principle at work­­: bringing seekers closer to wisdom and knowledge, often with a guru or spiritual master.

Ancient Books {6} ~ The Vedas

The Vedas are the oldest Hindu sacred texts, considered by many to be the most authoritative of all the texts. They are also the oldest known texts that contain yogic teachings. The Vedas are written in Sanskrit and originated in ancient India. There are four Vedas, or books, which make up the collection of Vedic literature.

The Vedas were written down thousands of years ago, but it is believed that they contain knowledge and wisdom that originated even long before then, passed down orally. Very little is known about the writers of the texts. In fact, Hindus regard the Vedas to be authorless, or not of man. Instead, they believe that they were originally revealed to ancient sages through divine inspiration.

Yoga that derives from the Vedas is known as Vedic yoga.

The Sanskrit word, veda, means “knowledge.” The Vedas are also referred to by some as sruti literature, meaning “what is heard,” as opposed to other sacred smrti texts, meaning “what is remembered.” In this way, they are considered to be the direct word of the Divine.

Orthodox schools of Indian philosophy take the Vedas as their spiritual authority. Other schools may not accept them as the authority, but still teach ideas that are expressed in the Vedas, such as the concept of karma.

The four books, or texts, of the Vedas are the “Rig Veda” (which is the oldest), the “Yajur Veda,” the “Sama Veda” and the “Atharva Veda.” They contain four types of text:

The Samhitas ~ Mantras and hymns for chanting
The Arankayas ~ Details of rituals and ceremonies for liturgy
The Brahmanas ~ Commentaries on rituals and ceremonies
The Upanishads ~ Discussion of meditation, philosophy and spiritual knowledge

The underlying philosophy, or teaching, of the Vedas is the concept that the individual is not an independent entity, but, rather, a part of the Universal Conscious.

The texts refer to many gods, including Indra, Agni and Soma. They also present many different creation stories.

~Guru Parampara~

According to religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, guru parampara refers to the uninterrupted succession of gurus. Derived from Sanskrit, guru means “teacher” and parampara means “uninterrupted series,” “continuation” or “succession.”

The passing down of knowledge, which is the concept of parampara, is central to yogic philosophy.

~Jagadguru~

Jagadguru is a term used for a guru whose influence on the world has the power to transform it. The term – literally meaning “guru of the world” – comes from the Sanskrit, jagat, meaning “world,” “Earth,” “the cosmos” or “mankind”; and guru, which means “teacher” and usually refers to a spiritual master.

The title of jagadguru is typically used in traditional orthodox Hinduism, particularly for acaryas (spiritual teachers) in the Vedanta school of thought who have written commentaries on the scriptures.

~Guru~

Guru is a term that is understood to mean “instructor” or “teacher.” In the culture of yoga, however, the term has a much more profound meaning. The disciple of yoga considers a guru to be a trusted spiritual master. In many yoga traditions, an intimate relationship with one’s guru is akin to a relationship with the Divine and is considered to be fundamental to the achievement of enlightenment.

~Ashram~

An ashram is the name traditionally given to a spiritual hermitage or a Hindu monastery. It can be used to describe the place where a spiritual or religious guru and their disciples live. The term may also be used to describe the community of people who reside in such a place.

Ashrams are usually secluded places separated from the rest of society. They are places devoted to spiritual activities like yoga, meditation or religious instruction.

From the Sanskrit root word srama, ashram means “making an effort toward liberation.”