Tag Archives: learn

Did You Know {190} ~ Seahorses Get “Married”

Seahorses tend to be monogamous, and will intertwine their tails to stick together while floating through the ocean. Is it because they’re cute and loving, or is it just an evolutionary aspect of their species? The truth is, seahorses are pretty bad swimmers, and spend a lot of time hiding from predators. Finding a mate for life boosts their chances of successful reproduction.

Reposts {10} ~ Our Minds Limit Science

Our ego mind is what limits us.  We are our own worst enemies.  We can’t be wrong.  We have to have others think like us.  The ego will get itself into trouble constantly.  Science is not immune to the ego.  In fact science is being run by one of the biggest ego trips ever in […]

Our Minds Limit Science

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~Greek Forms Of Love~

Though there are more Greek words for love, variants and possibly subcategories, a general summary considering these Ancient Greek concepts is as follows ~

~Agápe (ἀγάπη agápē) means “love: esp. brotherly love, charity; the love of God for man and of man for God”. Agape is used in ancient texts to denote feelings for one’s children and the feelings for a spouse, and it was also used to refer to a love feast. Agape is used by Christians to express the unconditional love of God for his children. This type of love was further explained by Thomas Aquinas as “to will the good of another”.

~Éros (ἔρως érōs) means “love, mostly of the sexual passion”. The Modern Greek word “erotas” means “intimate love”. Plato refined his own definition: Although eros is initially felt for a person, with contemplation it becomes an appreciation of the beauty within that person, or even becomes appreciation of beauty itself. Plato does not talk of physical attraction as a necessary part of love, hence the use of the word platonic to mean “without physical attraction”. In the Symposium, the most famous ancient work on the subject, Plato has Socrates argue that eros helps the soul recall knowledge of beauty and contributes to an understanding of spiritual truth, the ideal form of youthful beauty that leads us humans to feel erotic desire – thus suggesting that even that sensually based love aspires to the non-corporeal, spiritual plane of existence; that is, finding its truth, just like finding any truth, leads to transcendence. Lovers and philosophers are all inspired to seek truth through the means of eros.

~Philia (φιλία philía) means “affectionate regard, friendship”, usually “between equals”. It is a dispassionate virtuous love, a concept developed by Aristotle. In his best-known work on ethics, Nicomachean Ethics, philia is expressed variously as loyalty to friends (specifically, “brotherly love”), family, and community, and requires virtue, equality, and familiarity. Furthermore, in the same text philos is also the root of philautia denoting self-love and arising from it, a general type of love, used for love between family, between friends, a desire or enjoyment of an activity, as well as between lovers.

~Storge (στοργή storgē) means “love, affection” and “especially of parents and children”. It is the common or natural empathy, like that felt by parents for offspring. Rarely used in ancient works, and then almost exclusively as a descriptor of relationships within the family. It is also known to express mere acceptance or putting up with situations, as in “loving” the tyrant. This is also used when referencing the love for one’s country or a favorite sports team.

~Philautia (φιλαυτία philautía) means “self-love”. To love oneself or “regard for one’s own happiness” has been conceptualized both as a basic human necessity and as a moral flaw, akin to vanity and selfishness, synonymous with amour-propre or egotism. The Greeks further divided this love into positive and negative: one, the unhealthy version, is the self-obsessed love, and the other is the concept of self-compassion.

~Xenia (ξενία) is an ancient Greek concept of hospitality. It is sometimes translated as “guest-friendship” or “ritualized friendship”. It is an institutionalized relationship rooted in generosity, gift exchange, and reciprocity. Historically, hospitality towards foreigners and guests (Hellenes not of your polis) was understood as a moral obligation. Hospitality towards foreign Hellenes honored Zeus Xenios (and Athene Xenia) patrons of foreigners.

Did You Know {127} ~ Germany Uncovers 2,000 Tons Of Unexploded Bombs Every Year

During World War II, the Allied forces dropped over a total of 2.7 million tons of bombs on Germany. Due to certain defects in their delay timers, a large number of bombs never exploded—around 10 percent, or 200,000 tons. As they’ve been discovered in years since, it’s routine for German citizens to be evacuated from buildings or sectioned off on streets, while bomb experts handle the devices.

Did You Know {125} ~ Tornadoes Can Cause “Fish Rain”

Tornadoes can develop over water just as well as they can over land. When they do, they’re called “waterspouts,” and they suck up large amounts of lake or sea water—as well as whatever’s swimming in that water. If the waterspout travels on to the land and the winds decrease, there’s nowhere for those fish to go but down. As far as we know, there’s no tornado powerful enough to pick up sharks, but a fish-nado is entirely possible.