Tag Archives: meditation

~Anavopaya~

Anavopaya is a concept central to the practice of Kashmir Shaivism, also known as Trika (three-fold) philosophy. It is one of the three methods in the Shaivist tradition to attain transcendence of the self. Although considered the inferior method of the three, it is still believed that yogis who practice these methods can unite with the Divine Consciousness.

In anavopaya, an individual increases awareness of their God Consciousness through the practice of mantra, pranayama and meditation – specifically, meditation which focuses on the inhale and exhale of the breath.

~Yantra~

Yantra is a mystical diagram used in the Indian religions and philosophy for worship. It is used to help in meditation and for the benefits of its purported occult powers based on Tantric texts and Hindu astrology. It is a type of mandala, which is a spiritual symbol representing the universe.

In classical Sanskrit, the word, yantra, means “instrument,” “apparatus” or “contrivance.” It is derived from the root word, yam, meaning “to support” or “to sustain the essence of an object/concept.”

Journal {1} ~ 01/04/21 ~ Meditative Inner Child Healing

Allergic reactions day after day, laying in bed while the world plays. The vehicle appears to be getting weaker, the immune system lagging in time, is the next reaction going to end this life? These pills they shoved down my throat are decimating this young body, I miss that somebody years ago. The world rotates while I lay and bide this life’s course, in bed staring at walls and writing my heart out until it bleeds onto paper.

Sitting down to meditate, body pain riddes and rattles me. Breathing in pink light energised with love and visualising breathing out the pain and anxieties running through the mind, a foggy smoke regurgitates out; repeating this flow a few times. Meditative states bring me to scenes of the past like a movie flashing before me eyes. Tears tumble down my cheeks as I see the inner child lonely, afraid and scared, I hug her close, wipe her tears and tell her she is, I am, all she has been searching for. A healing meditation; thanking my guides and visualising once again a white light surrounding my body – my energy and auric field is safe and protected. Bowing my head, thanking God for this life even through the hell. Opening my doors to the soul, the world is clearer yet still in a foggy post-allergic reaction state, it is late afternoon now and it will take a couple days to recover. Seeing the blessings in all, this is a time to rest and write in bed, channelling my energy into words.

Hug your inner child, hug that child inside that was hurt. We all hurt.

Keep going, keep trudging through the mud and cloudy hazy initiation forests..

~Love is the answer. Amber, DiosRaw 01/04/21

Spirituality {1} ~ Rainbow Body

“In Tibetan Buddhism, it is said that certain meditation practices can alter the appearance of the body, transforming it into five radiant lights. The name given to this physical fluorescence is “rainbow body.”

In Vajrayana traditions of Tibetan Buddhism, tangible matter is considered to be made up of five elements: space, air, fire, water, and earth. As described in Tibetan literary sources, including The Tibetan Book of the Dead, the elemental energies that make up the cosmos are understood to be undifferentiated from those that make up the human body. Therefore, the body is simultaneously an individual person and the cosmic whole.

Certain Buddhist meditation practices are meant to alter the gravitational field of these five elements that constitute the body, transforming them into the five radiant lights of the color spectrum. The Tibetan name given to this physical fluorescence is jalu, literally meaning, “rainbow body.” Rainbow body is also the name given to the transformation of the ordinary physical body as a result of years of specific disciplined practices.

Reports from inside Tibet of rainbow bodies have emerged sporadically over the past century.

Tibetan traditions have identified signs that indicate when a practitioner has achieved rainbow body. While alive, it is said that the bodies of these beings do not cast a shadow in either lamplight or sunlight. At death, it is said that the physical body dramatically shrinks in size, exuding fragrances and perfumes rather than the odors of decomposition. A common Tibetan metric for the shrunken corpse of a rainbow body is the “length of a forearm.” Other signs are the sudden blooming of exotic plants and flowers anytime of year, as well as rainbows appearing in the sky.

There is also a special kind of rainbow body known as the “great transference into rainbow body,” or jalu powa chemo. This is the complete transference of the material body into radiance so that the only thing left of the body is hair and fingernails. While the historical origins of this phenomena are not well studied, the concept of the rainbow body is associated with the eighth-century Dzogchen meditation master Padmasambhava who, according to legend, achieved great transference and entered into a deathless state of being.

Reports from inside Tibet of rainbow bodies have emerged sporadically over the past century, though there has been an upturn of accounts over the past decades. The best known case is that of Yilungpa Sonam Namgyel, who achieved rainbow body in 1952, as recounted by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche in his memoir, Born in Tibet. There is also the case of Changchub Dorje, a medical doctor and leader of a Dzogchen community in the Nyarong region of eastern Tibet, about whom Chogyal Namkhai Norbu recounts in The Crystal and the Way of Light.”

Source: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.lionsroar.com/what-is-rainbow-body/amp/