Tag Archives: morality

Religion {13} ~ Atheism

Atheism is the absence of belief in any Gods or spiritual beings. The word Atheism comes from a, meaning without, and theism meaning belief in god or gods.

Atheists don’t use God to explain the existence of the universe.
Atheists say that human beings can devise suitable moral codes to live by without the aid of Gods or scriptures.
Reasons for non-belief
People are atheist for many reasons, among them:

~They find insufficient evidence to support any religion.
~They think that religion is nonsensical.
~They once had a religion and have lost faith in it.
~They live in a non-religious culture.
~Religion doesn’t interest them.
~Religion doesn’t seem relevant to their lives.
~Religions seem to have done a lot of harm in the world.
~The world is such a bad place that there can’t be a God.
~Many atheists are also secularist, and are hostile to any special treatment given to organised religion.

It is possible to be both atheist and religious. Virtually all Buddhists manage it, as do some adherents of other religions, such as Judaism and Christianity.

Atheists and morality
Atheists are as moral (or immoral) as religious people.

In practical terms atheists often follow the same moral code as religious people, but they arrive at the decision of what is good or bad without any help from the idea of God.

Philosophy {14} ~ Moral Relativism

Moral Relativism describes the way things are, without suggesting a way they ought to be. It seeks only to point out that people frequently disagree over what is the most moral course of action. Moral Relativism holds the position that the truth or falsity of moral judgments is not objective. Justifications for moral judgments are not universal, but are instead relative to the traditions, convictions, or practices of an individual or a group of people. The moral relativist might say, “It’s moral to me, because I believe it is.” Moral Relativism holds that because there is no universal moral standard by which to judge others, we ought to tolerate the behavior of others, even when it runs counter to our personal or cultural moral standards.