Tag Archives: psychological

Did You Know {100} ~ We {Unintentionally} Believe What We Want To Believe

Humans are victim to something called confirmation bias: the tendency to interpret facts in a way that confirms what we already believe. So no matter how many facts you throw at your uncle trying to sway his political opinions, there’s a good chance he isn’t going to budge. It’s one of the psychology facts you’ll just have to accept that you can’t change sometimes.

Did You Know {98} ~ We Automatically Second-Guess Ourselves When Other People Disagree

In a famous 1950s experiment, college students were asked to point out which of three lines was the same length as a fourth. When they heard others (who were in on the experiment) choose an answer that was clearly wrong, the participants followed their lead and gave that same wrong answer.

Did You Know {96} ~ We Always Try To Return A Favour

It’s not just good manners—the “rule of reciprocity” suggests that we’re programmed to want to help someone who’s helped us. It probably developed because, to keep society working smoothly, people need to help each other out. Stores like to use this against you, offering freebies in hopes that you’ll spend some cash.

Did You Know {95} ~ Putting Information In Bite-Sized Pieces Helps Us Remember

Your short-term memory can only hold on to so much information at a time (unless you try one of the simple ways to improve your memory), which is why you use “chunking” to remember long numbers. For instance, if you try to memorize this number: 90655372, you probably naturally thought something like 906-553-72.

Body Langauge {10} ~ Differences

Cultural Differences
Someone’s cultural background can have a big influence on how they use and read body language. In many Western cultures, eye contact while speaking suggests openness and interest. People of other cultures, including many Eastern cultures, may avoid prolonged eye contact, as looking slightly down or to the side may seem more respectful. Nodding indicates agreement in many cultures. In others, it might just mean the other person acknowledges your words.

Developmental Differences
Neurodiverse people may also use and interpret body language differently than neurotypical people do. For example, you might fidget when you’re bored, but neurodiverse people might fidget in order to increase focus, calm nervousness, or self-soothe in other ways. Autistic people may also have trouble reading body language.

Psychological Differences
Certain mental health conditions can also impact someone’s body language. Someone with social anxiety might find it extremely hard to meet and hold someone’s gaze, for example. People who prefer to avoid touching others may not shake hands or embrace when greeting someone. Being aware of boundaries some people may have around casual touch can help you avoid assuming someone dislikes you.

Guest Posts {9} ~ Making the Unconscious Conscious ~ A Higher Calling

~This is a guest post from LaDonna Remy ~ http://perspectiveontrauma.com~

From the writings of Carl Gustav Jung.

“Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.” ~ Carl G. Jung

Knowing and accepting oneself, fully, is a life’s work. One in which making the unconscious conscious, as Jung so eloquently states, in the above quote, is the real work in understanding and having direction in our lives.

This is not an easy journey. For Jung this meant finding one’s individual purpose in life. This individuation comes through gaining an understanding of one’s life story (that which lives in our personal unconscious) and further understanding that we are interconnected, as a people, and driven by forces held within our collective unconscious or collective conscience.

If you’re on a journey to know your own self (as Jung theorized is the purpose of this life) reading his sometimes mind bending and always thought-provoking work is a good companion in this process. Jung’s work and philosophies are deeply fascinating as they appear to merge the mystical and analytical to support one’s journey toward both understanding the self and contributing to a better world.

Carl Jung is one of the most influential and well-respected voices in analytic psychology. In reading his memoir (Memories, Dreams, Reflections) his courage and belief in doing (and living) what he believed was right, even in the face of incredible adversity, is evident.
Jung spoke of the soul (in part) as our center and the holder of unconscious material. The material found in the collective unconscious, that we are each born to our lifetime with. (Our ancestral and societal experiences). He believed that we receive messages from our unconscious that directs us in the process of individuation or finding our purpose. (In essence our higher calling.)

He recognized in his work and his writings (almost to the demise of his reputation and career) that there are larger internal and external forces at work in our lives. Further that these forces contain polarity. (Good and evil, difference and sameness, effectiveness and ineffectiveness’, beauty, and ugliness, etc.) It is this polarity that we must wrestle with, often unbeknownst to us, as we ideally find and live our purpose. This in turn, through outward manifestation, creates a better society for all.

He saw this process as identifying and accepting the polarity (good/evil) within us (through both our personal and collective history) as our work. An integration of our shadow, so to speak. It is in understanding the conflict between the poles, found here, and consciously wrestling with and choosing (for example) good over evil that we come to know and live our purpose or higher calling.

We could easily succumb to the less difficult path by not questioning or by going along with the larger masses or status quo. Within this process we unwittingly lend ourselves to further individual and collective pain. Believing this is fated. We simply accept and never struggle with the questions of our part in creating our own inner turmoil and the collective outward effects this has on the larger world.
In his memoir, Jung wrote of this process (the process of wrestling with and integrating our personal and collective shadow) stating “Such a conflict always presupposes a higher sense of responsibility”.

Jung, born in 1875, was exploring and beginning to share his theories in the early 1900’s. A time when psychiatry and psychology were in their infancy. His exploration over time (of this internal world) engaged and incorporated the work of theology, mythology, alchemy, dream analysis, symbolism, synchronicity, individuation, archetypes, paradoxical dilemma, world cultures and practices, thoughts on life after death, intuition/mediumship, and depths of the individual human psyche and collective consciousness.

It would have been easy for him to have gone along with the influential thinking of his time (where asylums were a predominate form of treatment) thankfully he did not. He explored the vast world of his clients and his own internal and ancestral self, incorporating the above ideologies, against considerable backlash. His work and personal journey gave us a much deeper and broader understanding of the human journey.
His contribution has been profound, much more detailed than what can be written here, and when understood lends much to individual and societal growth.

In one of his last writings (in 1959 prior to his passing in 1961) he summed his thinking on this matter very clearly in stating the following. “Today humanity as never before, is split into two apparently irreconcilable halves. The psychological rule says that when an inner situation is not made conscious, it happens outside, as fate. That is to say; when the individual remains undivided and does not become conscious of his inner contradictions, the world must per force act out the conflict and be torn into opposite halves”.

As written about, in previous posts, the current state of our world could be understood within Jungian concepts as could answers to many of the struggles we face individually and collectively. One would believe a considerable change might occur if we each struggled with our part, looking deeply into the eye of our own and our society’s history, and worked diligently to hold our self (through conscious thought and action) and in turn our society to the highest standard of accountability for the collective good of all citizens.

As always, I will add resources at the end of this article.

Deepest care and highest respect,
LaDonna

Copyright Protected Material: © 2014 ~ 2021 LaDonna Remy MSW, LICSW. All rights reserved. Written content on this blog (Perspective on Trauma) is the property of the author LaDonna Remy, MSW, LICSW. Any unauthorized use or duplication without written permission of the author/ owner of this web log is prohibited. Excerpts or quotes may be shared in the event the author is fully cited with reference and direction to this blog.

Professional Disclaimer: It is important to recognize that all information contained in the Perspective on Trauma Blog is informational. It is not intended to provide advice, assessment, treatment, or diagnosis. Content is not intended as a substitute for clinical care. It is not possible to provide informed care through web content, or to engage in an informed treatment relationship within this format. If you or a loved one need support; it is important that you access this care from your own (specifically assigned) health care provider.

Agreement of Use: In consideration for your use of and access to the Perspective on Trauma Blog, you agree that LaDonna Remy MSW, LICSW is not liable to you for any action or non-action you may take in reliance upon information from the Perspective on Trauma blog. As noted; it is not possible to provide informed (personalized care) through blog content. In the event, support is needed it is your responsibility to seek care from your own health-care provider.

Photo: Pixabay

National Hotlines:
Treatment Referral Helpline: (1-877-726-4727)
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-825

Resources:

Website: https://www.facebook.com/JungianSynchronicity

Books:
Jung Carl G. and Jaffe’ Aneila: Memories, Dreams, Reflections.
Jung Carl G: The Red Book.
Jung Carl G: Modern Man in Search of a Soul.

Documentary:
Whitney, Mark. Matter of Heart.

~To see more of this writer’s work ~ http://perspectiveontrauma.com

~To guest post feel free to share over your post by going to this blog’s connect page to find my email.~

Psychology {8} ~ Humanistic Psychology

Humanistic, humanism and humanist are terms in psychology relating to an approach which studies the whole person and the uniqueness of each individual. Essentially, these terms refer to the same approach in psychology.

Humanistic psychology is a perspective that emphasizes looking at the the whole person, and the uniqueness of each individual. Humanistic psychology begins with the existential assumptions that people have free will and are motivated to acheive their potential and self-actualize.

The humanistic approach in psychology developed as a rebellion against what some psychologists saw as the limitations of the behaviorist and psychodynamic psychology.

The humanistic approach is thus often called the “third force” in psychology after psychoanalysis and behaviorism (Maslow, 1968).

Humanism rejected the assumptions of the behaviorist perspective which is characterized as deterministic, focused on reinforcement of stimulus-response behavior and heavily dependent on animal research.

Humanistic psychology also rejected the psychodynamic approach because it is also deterministic, with unconscious irrational and instinctive forces determining human thought and behavior. Both behaviorism and psychoanalysis are regarded as dehumanizing by humanistic psychologists.

Humanistic psychology expanded its influence throughout the 1970s and the 1980s. Its impact can be understood in terms of three major areas:

1) It offered a new set of values for approaching an understanding of human nature and the human condition.

2) It offered an expanded horizon of methods of inquiry in the study of human behavior.

3) It offered a broader range of more effective methods in the professional practice of psychotherapy.

Source: https://www.simplypsychology.org/humanistic.html