Tag Archives: science

Nutrition {11} ~ Vitamins {2} ~ Uses & Recommended Amounts

RETINOIDS AND CAROTENE (Vitamin A; includes retinol, retinal, retinyl esters, and retinoic acid and are also referred to as “preformed” vitamin A. Beta carotene can easily be converted to vitamin A as needed.) Essential for vision Lycopene may lower prostate cancer risk. Keeps tissues and skin healthy. Plays an important role in bone growth and in the immune system. Diets rich in the carotenoids alpha carotene and lycopene seem to lower lung cancer risk. Carotenoids act as antioxidants. Foods rich in the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin may protect against cataracts. M: 900 mcg (3,000 IU) W: 700 mcg (2,333 IU).

THIAMIN (vitamin B1) Helps convert food into energy. Needed for healthy skin, hair, muscles, and brain and is critical for nerve function. M: 1.2 mg, W: 1.1 mg.

RIBOFLAVIN (vitamin B2) Helps convert food into energy. Needed for healthy skin, hair, blood, and brain. M: 1.3 mg, W: 1.1 mg.

NIACIN (vitamin B3, nicotinic acid) Helps convert food into energy. Essential for healthy skin, blood cells, brain, and nervous system. M: 16 mg, W: 14 mg 35 mg.

PANTOTHENIC ACID (vitamin B5) Helps convert food into energy. Helps make lipids (fats), neurotransmitters, steroid hormones, and hemoglobin. M: 5 mg, W: 5 mg.

PYRIDOXINE (vitamin B6, pyridoxal, pyridoxine, pyridoxamine) Aids in lowering homocysteine levels and may reduce the risk of heart disease. Helps convert tryptophan to niacin and serotonin, a neurotransmitter that plays key roles in sleep, appetite, and moods. Helps make red blood cells Influences cognitive abilities and immune function. 31–50 years old: M: 1.3 mg, W: 1.3 mg; 51+ years old: M: 1.7 mg, W: 1.5 mg 100 mg.

COBALAMIN (vitamin B12) Aids in lowering homocysteine levels and may lower the risk of heart disease. Assists in making new cells and breaking down some fatty acids and amino acids. Protects nerve cells and encourages their normal growth. Helps make red blood cells and DNA. M: 2.4 mcg, W: 2.4 mcg.

Source ~ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/listing_of_vitamins

~The Möbius Strip~

“The Möbius strip or Möbius band is a surface with only one side and only one boundary component. The Möbius strip has the mathematical property of being non-orientable. It can be realized as a ruled surface. It was discovered independently by the German mathematicians August Ferdinand Möbius and Johann Benedict Listing in 1858.

August Ferdinand Möbius (November 17, 1790 – September 26, 1868) was a German mathematician and theoretical astronomer.

He is best known for his discovery of the Möbius strip, a non-orientable two-dimensional surface with only one side when embedded in three-dimensional Euclidean space. It was independently discovered by Johann Benedict Listing around the same time. The Möbius configuration, formed by two mutually inscribed tetrahedra, is also named after him. Möbius was the first to introduce homogeneous coordinates into projective geometry.

A model of the Möbius strip can be easily created by taking a paper strip and giving it a half-twist, and then joining the ends of the strip together to form a loop. In Euclidean space there are two types of Möbius strips depending on the direction of the half-twist: clockwise and counterclockwise. That is to say, it is a chiral object with “handedness” (right-handed or left-handed).

The Möbius band (equally known as the Möbius strip) is not a surface of only one geometry (i.e., of only one exact size and shape), such as the half-twisted paper strip depicted in the illustration to the right. Rather, mathematicians refer to the (closed) Möbius band as any surface that is homeomorphic to this strip. Its boundary is a simple closed curve, i.e., homeomorphic to a circle. This allows for a very wide variety of geometric versions of the Möbius band as surfaces each having a definite size and shape. For example, any closed rectangle with length L and width W can be glued to itself (by identifying one edge with the opposite edge after a reversal of orientation) to make a Möbius band. Some of these can be smoothly modeled in 3-dimensional space, and others cannot. Yet another example is the complete open Möbius band. Topologically, this is slightly different from the more usual — closed — Möbius band, in that any open Möbius band has no boundary.

While the idea of Mobius strip architecture has been tackled before, perhaps no scheme has been so ambitious as Vincent Callebaut’s “Swallow’s Nest,” a proposed arts and literature center for the Taiwanese city of Taichung seen below.

Composed of a series of isosceles triangles gradually rotated around an ellipse, the building creates a dramatic division between interior and exterior while allowing the integration of public space into the center of the building by means of “the Infinite Patio.” The twisting of the structure also allows for three large vaulted spaces for the display of art objects.”

Source ~ https://www.google.com/amp/s/germanculture.com.ua/famous-germans/mobius-strip-and-its-inventor/amp/

Theories & Hypnotheses {1} ~ The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis

The aquatic ape hypothesis (AAH), also referred to as aquatic ape theory (AAT) or the waterside hypothesis of human evolution, postulates that the ancestors of modern humans took a divergent evolutionary pathway from the other great apes by becoming adapted to a more aquatic habitat.

The hypothesis was initially proposed by the marine biologist Alister Hardy in 1960, who argued that a branch of apes was forced by competition over terrestrial habitats to hunt for food such as shellfish on the sea shore and sea bed, leading to adaptations that explained distinctive characteristics of modern humans such as functional hairlessness and bipedalism. Elaine Morgan’s 1990 book on the hypothesis, Scars of Evolution, received some favorable reviews but was subject to criticism from the anthropologist John Langdon in 1997, who characterized it as an “umbrella hypothesis” with inconsistencies that were unresolved and a claim to parsimony that was false.

The hypothesis is highly controversial, and has been criticized as pseudoscience. The hypothesis is thought to be more popular with the lay public than with scientists; in the scientific literature, it is generally ignored by anthropologists.

Source ~ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquatic_ape_hypothesis#:~:text=The%20aquatic%20ape%20hypothesis%20(AAH,to%20a%20more%20aquatic%20habitat.

Nutrition {3} ~ Metabolism

Metabolism is a term that is used to describe all chemical reactions involved in maintaining the living state of the cells and the organism. Metabolism can be divided into two categories ~

Catabolism ~ the breakdown of molecules to obtain energy
Anabolism ~ the synthesis of all compounds needed by the cells

Metabolism is closely linked to nutrition and the availability of nutrients. Bioenergetics is a term that describes the biochemical or metabolic pathways by which the cell ultimately obtains energy. Energy formation is one of the vital components of metabolism.

Nutrition is the key to metabolism. The pathways of metabolism rely upon nutrients that they breakdown in order to produce energy. This energy in turn is required by the body to synthesize molecules like new proteins and nucleic acids (DNA, RNA).

Nutrients in relation to metabolism encompass factors like bodily requirements for various substances, individual functions in the body, the amount needed, and the level below which poor health results.

Essential nutrients supply energy (calories) and supply the necessary chemicals which the body itself cannot synthesize. Food provides a variety of substances that are essential for the building, upkeep, and repair of body tissues, and for the efficient functioning of the body.

The diet needs essential nutrients like carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and around 20 other inorganic elements. The major elements are supplied in carbohydrates, lipids, and protein. In addition, vitamins, minerals and water are necessary.

Did You Know {89} ~ Fear Can Feel Good, If We’re Not Really In Danger

Not everyone loves scary movies, but for the people who do, there are a few theories as to why—the main one coming down to hormones. When you’re watching a scary movie or walking through a haunted house, you get all the adrenaline, endorphins, and dopamine from a fight-or-flight response, but no matter how scared you feel, your brain recognizes that you’re not really in danger—so you get that natural high without the risk.

Articles {2} ~ Does Consciousness Create Our Material Reality? – Collective Evolution

https://www.collective-evolution.com/2021/06/10/does-consciousness-create-physical-material-reality/

“Where does the “physical” world come from? Matter at its smallest observable form, atoms, pop in and out of existence all the time. The idea that physical matter is birthed from a non physical realm, such as the “quantum vacuum” or the “void”, or something else we are unaware of is not novel. Nikola Tesla himself believed that “all perceptible matter comes from a primary substance, or tenuity beyond conception, filling all space, the akasha, or luminiferous ether, which is acted upon by the life-giving Prana or creative force, calling into existence, in never-ending cycles all things and phenomena.” (Man’s Greatest Achievement, 1907)~ Article

~Through The Looking Glass~

“I want to introduce you to the phrase, “Through the looking glass”. It’s a great phrase to keep in mind if you’re going deep into the existential work that we do here.

The phrase comes from the title of Lewis Carroll’s famous novel, Through The Looking Glass, sequel to Alice In Wonderland. In the sequel Alice goes through the looking glass — looking glass is just an old fashioned word for a mirror — and of course discovers a strange and wacky alternative universe.

“Through the looking glass” is a metaphorical expression which means: on the bizarre side, in the twilight zone, in a strange parallel world where things are weird, loopy, and upside-down.

So what’s the point?

The point is, consciousness has dimensions to it which are through the looking glass. Strange, bizarre, loopy, surreal, maddening. This physical dimension of conscious which we call Earth is just one tiny dimension out of infinite others which are not limited by the laws of physics, logic, or even sanity. These strange realms can be scary and shocking to the unprepared mind that only expects reality to fit its narrow logical categories. It’s important to keep this in the back of your mind as you start doing spiritual work. Be prepared that one day you will find yourself through the looking glass. When it happens to you, don’t freak out, don’t panic. Stay calm and remind yourself that this was supposed to happen. This was the point of your work.

Especially you’re going to use psychedelics you’ll come to appreciate the significance of this phrase. Keeping these words in the back of your mind might help you to avert a bad trip.

What do you do when you suddenly find yourself through the looking glass? Enjoy the scenery, like an explorer in some uncharted land. As Terence McKenna said, “God is some kind of lost continent in the human mind.” Or more accurately, the human mind a tiny island in the mind of God.”

Source ~ https://www.actualized.org/insights?p=14